Tips for choosing domain name from experts

Bias towards .com

I know, it's 2017. Why are we still talking about .com? The internet's been around 20-plus years. Why does .com matter so much when there are so many TLD extension options? The answer is, .com is the most recognized and most accessible TLD. Cognitive fluency dictates that we should go with something easy, that people have an association with, and .com is still the primary TLD. If you want to build up a very brandable domain that can do well, you want a .com. Probably, eventually, if you are very successful, you're going to have to try and go capture it anyway, and so I would bias you to get it if you can If it's unavailable, my suggestion would be to go with the .net, .co, or a known ccTLD. Those are your best bets. A known ccTLD might be something like .ca in Canada or .it in Italy. - Rand Fishkin - Moz


Shorter is always better

As we've been saying, shorter is better. If you can't get your domain name down to one memorable word (almost impossible to come by these days), then consider adding one or maximum two more words. Combinations of two words work great for the memorable names like LifeHacker.com or GeekSquad.com. Also, don't use an acronym. People will never remember the letters unless it's a highly catchy name. - Ogi Djuraskovic - FirstSiteGuide team


Avoid hyphens

Never create a domain name with hyphens. Hyphens can be a sign of spam domains, which you do not want to be associated with. You don't want to give the wrong impression to potential visitors. Hyphenated domains are also prone to typos. If you choose a domain name with hyphens because the domain you want is already taken, your users will end up at your competitor's site if they forget to type in the hyphens. - wpbeginner


Make it pronounceable

This tip is closely related to our first bit of advice. Even though users aren't likely to be saying your domain name out loud, pronounceability is still important. This is because of something called processing fluency: the ease with which our brains can process information. Names that don't require a person to think too hard are usually the easiest to remember, and also more likely to inspire positive associations. 'If you have to spell it over the phone, you've lost.' says Jason Calacanis, the serial entrepreneur and angel investor behind tech giants like Uber, the Launch Festival, and This Week in Startups. When people routinely misspell your domain name because it's too hard to figure out, all of that potential traffic is lost. Most people will give up searching for your brand's site quickly; they don't have the time or desire to try multiple Google searches of possible spellings. The lesson here is simple: make it easy for your customers to find you! - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Avoid numbers and hyphens

Numbers and hyphens are often misunderstood - people who hear your website address don't know if you're using a numeral (5) or it's spelled out (five) or they misplace or forget the dash. If you need these in your domain, register the different variations to be safe - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Start with keywords

Before logging into to your favorite domain registrar, take some time to brainstorm a few ideas. It can be helpful to have three to five keywords in mind when doing this exercise. These words and phrases should clearly define what you do (or want to do). Mix and mash them together and see what looks right and makes sense. Don't force the process - just let it flow. For example, let's say you are starting a local bakery. Some terms you want to include would be your city, fresh bread, baked goods, bakery and so on. Here's a pro tip: Use prefixes and suffixes to help you create a good domain that grabs attention. For this example, you may end up with a domain like superfreshbread.com. - Ryan Shelley - Search Engine Land


Avoid strings of words

If you have a wide range of interests and you also want to incorporate keywords in your domain, you might be tempted to string them all together. I recommend against this simply because it's confusing. LuresRodsLinesPoles.com is a recipe for major confusion when a visitor is trying to remember the correct order. - Amy Lynn Andrews


Always Register Your Domain Name Yourself

It's a good idea to not let anyone else (such as an agency) register a domain name for you. Even though it's slightly less hassle that way (since someone else does all the work), it can lead to trouble later on. If someone else registers the domain, you're giving them a hold over you and your website. If you ever want to move away from their services, you can encounter trouble in terms of them not being too eager to transfer the domain over to you and give you full control of it. Just to name a few bad things that can happen: They may take an awfully long time to complete the transfer, they may try to extort some fees from you to do that, or they may decline completely (based on some fine print in your initial agreement). Plus, perhaps most importantly, if the agency/person goes bankrupt or loses access to the domain registrar for whatever reason, you could lose your domain name entirely. Long story short, always register your domains on your own. It's not that difficult anyway. - Karol K - Winning WP


Check social networks

Before you register your desired domain name, it's always a good idea to check social networks for the same name. To keep your site name constant and to build your brand, you want a name that is readily available. For example: check facebook.com/yourdomain, twitter.com/yourdomain - and secure them as well. KnowEm is a great tool to use to see if certain names are already branded on social platforms. - Ogi Djuraskovic - FirstSiteGuide team


Make it easy to type

Finding a domain name that's easy to type is critical to online success. If you use slang (u instead of you) or words with multiple spellings (express vs. xpress), it might be harder for customers to find your site. - Andrea Rowland - GoDaddy


Premium domain names for sale

Please contact us if you are interesting in any