Tips for choosing domain name from experts

Keep it short, but not too short

Shortness can help keep a domain name simple and memorable, but going too short can have the opposite effect. Compare 'PastaScience.com' to 'PastaSci.com'. Thanks to the abbreviation, the latter is harder to both pronounce and remember, despite it having fewer characters. The first version works fine. The key here is to strike a balance. Go for something brief, but don't mangle your name by hacking off whole parts of words. In the pursuit of brevity, many consider using an acronym for their domain name. But that's usually only wise if your brand or product is regularly referred to by the initials. For example, the World Wildlife Fund's website can be found at WWF.org. That's perfect for them, since their charity is widely known and referred to as simply 'WWF'. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Register Your Corresponding Social Media Handles

Social media is key these days - whether we like it or not. The average web-connected human spends one hour on Facebook every day, and, in total, Facebook gets 2 billion visits a month. That's BILLION. What I'm trying to say is: People are much more likely to check what's going on with your brand on Facebook than by actually visiting your website. This is just one of the reasons why you absolutely have to have your professional profiles set up on the most popular social media sites. Whenever possible, get the same handles as your domain name. If these are taken, be creative and use some suffixes or prefixes. Some options: now, daily, hq, get, app. For example, my fictional Lotterio.com brand could go by LotterioHQ on Twitter. - Karol K - Winning WP


Start with keywords

Before logging into to your favorite domain registrar, take some time to brainstorm a few ideas. It can be helpful to have three to five keywords in mind when doing this exercise. These words and phrases should clearly define what you do (or want to do). Mix and mash them together and see what looks right and makes sense. Don't force the process - just let it flow. For example, let's say you are starting a local bakery. Some terms you want to include would be your city, fresh bread, baked goods, bakery and so on. Here's a pro tip: Use prefixes and suffixes to help you create a good domain that grabs attention. For this example, you may end up with a domain like superfreshbread.com. - Ryan Shelley - Search Engine Land


Buy the Common Misspellings of Your Domain

This, however, can grow your annual domain bill even further, so it's your call. In general, you're going to be pretty safe if you just focus on a couple of the most likely misspellings of the domain. Looking at my earlier example, Lotterio.com could be misspelled as Loterio.com - single 'T'. Once you have those, redirect them back to your main domain name. - Karol K - Winning WP


No hyphens

It's not very smooth or punchy to specify a hyphen. ('Hi my name is Jane and my domain is fly hyphen fishing dot com.') - Amy Lynn Andrews


Use broad keywords

Keywords in a domain name can help with the cognitive fluency biases, but also from an SEO perspective. Google has been biasing away from these exact match and partial match domains, but the anchor text you get from people linking to your domain can help. If you can get a keyword mention in your domain name that helps make it obvious what you're website is about, go for it. But if you're trying to secure a keyword rich or a keyword targeted domain, I would stay away from those in 2017. They don't carry the weight that they used to, and have negative associations (with users and search engines) that you should avoid. For example, I would not purchase a domain name like; RecipesForPasta.com or BuyPastaOnline.com. I would instead, go for something very broad like Gusto.com. Think about Amazon.com or Google.com, which clearly has no association with what it is. These are very well-branded, but don't have keyword richness to them. It's more of a creative association, just like 'gusto' means 'taste' in Italian. So I might be tempted to go in that direction instead. - Rand Fishkin - Moz


Make it instantly intuitive

The ideal domain name should give users a good idea of what your business is all about. For instance, Rand Fishkin uses 'PastaPerfected.com' as an example of an intuitive domain name for a site all about pasta. Right off the bat, a potential customer can make a good guess as to what they'll find at that site (perfect pasta!). Your domain name should have the same effect. Additionally, instant intuitiveness gives bonus points for memorability. When people can grasp your site's concept just from the domain name, you can bet that it's going to stick in their minds. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


The Right Domain Will Help You Get Found

Domain names impact your rank in search results. Search engines like Google try to determine what your website is about so they can list it in relevant searches. The domain is one of the first places they look for clues about your business. To help potential clients find you in searches, choose a domain name with keywords related to your business. For example, if you are a contractor, you might want to purchase a domain name like www.yournameconstruction.com - Wix


Leave room to expand

It's smart to choose a domain name that's related to your niche because it gives users some idea of what your site is about. But you don't want to limit your options too much. For example, a florist might choose a domain name like orchidblog.com, but then want to start blogging about other flowers besides orchids. In that case, the domain might prevent you from attracting readers interested in other flowers. - wpbeginner


Make it pronounceable

This tip is closely related to our first bit of advice. Even though users aren't likely to be saying your domain name out loud, pronounceability is still important. This is because of something called processing fluency: the ease with which our brains can process information. Names that don't require a person to think too hard are usually the easiest to remember, and also more likely to inspire positive associations. 'If you have to spell it over the phone, you've lost.' says Jason Calacanis, the serial entrepreneur and angel investor behind tech giants like Uber, the Launch Festival, and This Week in Startups. When people routinely misspell your domain name because it's too hard to figure out, all of that potential traffic is lost. Most people will give up searching for your brand's site quickly; they don't have the time or desire to try multiple Google searches of possible spellings. The lesson here is simple: make it easy for your customers to find you! - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


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