Tips for choosing domain name from experts

Append or modify if necessary

Tried all the tips above, but ended up with a domain name that's unavailable? If you have your heart set on a domain name, you can append or modify it a little to make it unique for registration. You can add a prefix or suffix, as was done in Rand's examples of 'ThePastaTerra.com' or 'PastaTerraShop.com'. You also have a little wiggle room on tip #4: go ahead and use a different extension, so long as it doesn't conflict with the other tips and works for your brand and audience. This might look something like 'Terra.Pasta'. We hope that these 8 tips help you zone in on the most effective domain name for your site. If you're currently juggling a few domain name ideas, feel free to share them in the comments. We'd love to hear what you're considering, and can help your business establish a thriving web presence. We offer services like website design and search marketing, all engineered to give you a leg up on the competition. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Always Go for the .com

Let me say this again: Wherever possible, always go for a .com domain. Exhibit A: This site. Technically speaking, the .com is just one of many domain name extensions (TLDs) that are available (more on TLDs and other components of a domain name here). Some of the other popular options include, .net, .org, .co, .edu, .biz, or even things such as .shop, or .blog. And while all those fancy TLDs are tempting, getting the classic .com is nearly always the right thing to do. Two reasons: People are more familiar with .com domains than with anything else; they will default to typing '.com' into the browser address bar, and are unlikely to remember your extension if it's too weird. Everyone will always assume a website is a .com. The .com TLD is used by ~47% of all websites, data says. Can they all be wrong? What all of this means is that if your perfect .com is taken, then perhaps you should either forget about that name entirely or try contacting the current owner to see if they're willing to sell the domain to you. Warning! This could be expensive. - Karol K - Winning WP


Be brandable

Your domain name is the face of your company-in the form of a URL. Therefore, you should make sure it actually sounds like a brand. So, how do you do that? With simplicity, novelty, and memorability. Avoid inserting hyphens, numbers, or anything else that makes it sound unnatural and complicated. A great example is Pepsi.com. That domain name is leagues beyond inferior options like 'Pepsi-cola.com' or 'Pepsi-2-drink.com'. - Denis Pinsky - Forbes


Keep It Short, Simple, and Predictable

So, we already talked about brandability (if that's a word), but there are also some other, more general, characteristics of a quality domain name. The big four being: short - preferably with fewer than 15(-ish) characters, excluding the TLD simple - no hyphens, no underscores, no complicated words as part of the domain, or any other punctuation just words - avoid using numbers unless absolutely necessary (for example, if it's part of your brand name, such as 9gag.com) predictable - no weird spellings (for example, if your name is Myke and you want to make it part of your domain - such as MykeBlogs.com - every single time people will mistype it as MikeBlogs.com. - Karol K - Winning WP


Be Careful When Buying Existing Domain Names

As I mentioned a couple of points above, buying an existing domain name is a bit different from buying a new one. First of all, since it's not new, this means it already has a history. And you can never be entirely sure what that history is. On the bright side, the domain's history may give you a boost in Google since you're not starting from scratch - Google already knows the domain. But, on the flip side, if the domain has featured any kind of 'non-kosher' stuff (porn, gambling, spam content, email spam distribution), then it may be banned from Google entirely. Buying your domain from a marketplace such as Flippa gives you some safety, since every domain is validated at least in the most basic way. However, to make things a bit safer, you should also perform checks of your own. First, do a manual check by going to Google and searching for: site:YOURDOMAIN.com This will tell you whether Google has any pages indexed from that domain. Finding anything is a good sign. It means the domain isn't banned. Not finding anything doesn't have to be a deal-breaker, though. If the domain is blank - no website - then there's nothing for Google to find in the first place. However, if there is a website but Google can't see it (via the site:YOURDOMAIN.com phrase), this is a red flag. You can also do checks via tools such as bannedcheck.com and ismywebsitepenalized.com. But also keep in mind that these things are not foolproof. Consider them helpers. - Karol K - Winning WP


Don't fall for trends

Just because something is trending now, it doesn't mean it always will. Copying what someone else is doing can lead you down the wrong path. Stay away from odd spellings and lots of hyphens or numbers. Keep it simple, focused and easy to remember. - Ryan Shelley - Search Engine Land


Make it easy to pronounce and spell

You should be able to easily share your domain when speaking as well as writing. You never know when you'll be asked to share your domain name in person. It should be easy to understand and spell for any listener. - wpbeginner


Don't overthink it

I hear from a lot of people who get stuck at this point because they're afraid of making the wrong choice. The most common problem is that they can't find an available .com. If this is you, just make your best guess and move on. A not-quite-perfect domain name is better than no domain name at all. Just do your best and own it! - Amy Lynn Andrews


Avoid obscure terms

If you are trying to appeal to a wide audience, avoid using niche-specific terms in your domain that someone outside your niche would be unfamiliar with. - Amy Lynn Andrews


Easy to Type

Think of some of the most popular websites in the world. What comes to mind? Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Yahoo, CNN... One big thing they have in common is that they're all easy to spell. Your visitors should be able to type your domain name without a problem. If you have to explain the spelling more than once for it to be understood, then it's too complicated. The last thing you want is for potential visitors to mistype your domain and end up on a different website! Here's an easy way to test this... Tell 10 people your potential domain name and ask them to spell it. If more than a few people struggle to spell it, then you need to simplify it. - ROBERT MENING - WebsiteSetup


Premium domain names for sale

Please contact us if you are interesting in any